Still moving (hah!)

The only nice thing about this move is that I’m not forced to hurry everything up; it’s not like my current lease is ending tomorrow and I better have all my stuff out if I don’t want to pay blood money. Other than that, it’s a giant PITA: work has suffered, this blog has suffered, I’ve suffered.

Most recent task: attempt to remove all the dust that pervades my place. New apartment = nobody’s ruined the place already = nice, but new apartment = just built = construction dust. That task continues tomorrow, as does the moving of stuff. I was amused, this evening, by the fact that a random piece of my new silverware seems to weigh as much, if not more, than one of my Corelle plates.

I’m not quite sure how to feel about the observation, recently underscored, that all I need to survive and be productive to society are my clothes, a bunch of necessities (e.g. soap) that I’ve had to purchase, and my computer with an internet connection. Everything else is pretty much entertainment icing on my life.

Thursday turned out to be a reasonable eventful day—or, at least, a day that had events that weren’t directly related to moving. During our regularly scheduled trip to the Beanery, Brian and I had the opportunity to have an extended chat with (yet another) Beanery staff-person. Sophie (Sofie?*) is a personal hero to both Brian and myself. [*I shall alternate spellings throughout, as she seems the type of gal who would approve of such a technique in the face of uncertainty.] A couple weeks ago, Beanery Staff-Gal A—who had been stacking chairs on tables—was stunned when the seat of the chair she was trying to stack fell to the floor while she was inverting the chair. She then asked what she should do, and Sofie advised her to put it back and pretend that didn’t happen—that someone else could deal with it. On Thursday we learned that Sophie was a language student at OSU (she’s at least tetra-lingual, including English**). We also were able to help her (however minorly) deal with a potted tree that was intent on taking its own life (i.e. fall over), as well as advise her on how we’d seen other Beanery types stack chairs. (Sofie’s approach was to invert one chair and stack its seat on that of another chair, and put both chairs up on the table; we had always seen one chair inverted on the table, and the other inverted and placed on the first chair at a funky angle. [Thrilling, no?])

[**I must give respect to anyone who can manage more than two languages. I’ve found that I have two language buckets: “English,” and “Everything Else.” The only foreign languages that I know more than a handful of words in are Spanish and Japanese—and I mix them up all the bloody time.]

After the Beanery, Brian and I adjourned to Brian’s house for further chat. Brian kept the front door open as we chatted, as it was an extremely pleasant evening (made even more pleasant by contrast to the heat we had just experienced). Then nature attacked.

A fucking hummingbird Mothra giant moth breezed through the door, and made a beeline towards us. Which also happened to be towards the overhead light. (The thing really was as large as a hummingbird, and it made a hell of a noise as it flew around. There was some serious meat on it.)

The light apparently toasted the little ginormous bugger pretty well before Brian got to the switch to turn it off. His hope, of course, was to get that mutant out of his home. Instead of flying off, the moth had some difficulty getting out of the light’s shade, and then had a barely-controlled flight to the floor. After struggling on the ground for a few moments (complete with multiple aborted attempts to take off), the poor thing finally got going again, and disappeared into the darkness of the dining area.

And then we heard a THWOK.

Brian and I shared a horrified laugh at that; not only had a plus-sized moth just paid us a visit, but it seriously injured itself in our presence—and then it flew straight into a wall.

After a few minutes of silence, we went to investigate: Brian found the creature clinging to the wall. He marked how large the moth was (body length of two inches—two very meaty inches—and I believe Brian’s measurement was conservative), and then cupped and released it back into the wild.

The moth barely put up a resistance to the entire procedure; it obviously wasn’t doing well. All the same, it’s probably not in the human race’s interest to encourage the existence bird-sized bugs.

On Friday, Brian, John and I watched the modern classic anime film Fatal Fury: The Motion Picture. FF:TMP was one of my first introductions to anime; I watched it many years ago, when the Sci-Fi channel would play a random anime movie at midnight on Saturday—i.e. Sunday morning. (Best TV viewing ever: MST3K would be on earlier in the evening, and then I’d just dink around until midnight arrived.) I remember also watching Tenchi Muyo in Love, Urusei Yatsura: Beautiful Dreamer, and Galaxy Express 999 in that same slot; good times. (I was horribly tired when I saw Beautiful Dreamer, and to this day I really only feel like watching it when I’m otherwise ready to fall asleep… not the worst state of mind for the movie’s subject, actually.)

My initial impression of the Fatal Fury movie was that it was a fun romp around the world. When I watched it a second time, I realized that I’m not a good judge of quality after midnight.

I can’t say that FF:TMP is good. The entire movie revolves around a random girl who asks for Terry’s help—but she doesn’t want to tell Terry about why she actually needs help until later. Based on that, Terry, Andy, and Mai agree to help her—to wander around the world without first knowing why. Only Joe gives a reason—and that reason was what the heck, I don’t have anything better to do.

Not the strongest plot ever.

Nevertheless, I still grin from ear to ear when I watch it. It’s fun, even if it’s not good.

 

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